CofC Logo

Italian Studies

Interdisciplinary Minor

Minor

“In my Italian poetry course, we learned about Dante. It’s fascinating because it’s brilliant work, but also because he had such tremendous influence. In addition, the Italian department is well connected with the Italian community in Charleston, which adds a satisfying dimension to the experience because of the food and the cultural activities.”
– Jessica Bruce ’12

Someone says “Italian” and you think … the Renaissance, right? No? OK, what about fashion? Food? Opera? Racy politics? Michelangelo, maybe? Whatever reference comes to mind, Italy and the Italian world — specifically the history and culture — have deeply permeated much of modern civilization. In turn, that influence has altered and shaped social and cultural phenomena around the globe.

From architecture to food to language, religion, government — you name it — Italians have had a pronounced impact. Where would modern science be without the seminal contributions of Da Vinci, Galileo or Enrico Fermi? How would music have evolved without the work of Guido d’Arezzo, who was responsible for first arranging musical notes on paper? And what would be the status of visual art without the crucial influence of Michelangelo, Caravaggio and Raphael?

At the College of Charleston, we recognize the importance of these contributions and more through our Italian Studies minor. This program not only teaches the language and literature of Italy, but also examines:

  • geography
  • film
  • politics
  • sociology
  • music
  • art history
  • business
  • philosophy
  • education

This comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach is rooted in our belief that a strong grasp of Italy’s role in the world is fundamental for understanding Western cultural evolution. Our courses provide a sound basis for a broad range of academic pursuits as well as important grounding for careers, particularly in design, politics, entertainment, religion and international business.

So when someone says Italian, think Italian studies at the College of Charleston, and do yourself a favor — check it out.